2021 Programme

29 & 30 September 2021

09:00 - 12:30 - Keynote

Day 1 Morning Session - Keynote Presentations

Flying You Supersonic Everywhere by Muting the Sonic Boom

Norris Tie, Co-Founder and CEO, Exosonic

Day 1 Morning Session - Keynote Presentations

Day 1 Morning Session - Keynote Presentations

Sustainable & Smart Aviation: The Scramjet Solution to CO2 pollution

Prof. Dr. Michael Smart, Head of R&D and Co-Founder, Hypersonix Launch Systems

Day 1 Morning Session - Keynote Presentations

Europe - Australia in 80 minutes: DLR-SpaceLIner vs. SpaceX Starship

Martin Sippel, Head of Space Launcher System Analysis (SART), DLR - German Aerospace Centre

13:30 - 14:30 - Panel Discussion

What will be the propulsion technologies for the future?

14:30 - 15:30 - Case Study

Day 1 Afternoon Session – Flight testing and Simulation

Flight Test Instrumentation Solutions for Supersonic and Hypersonic Vehicles

Patrick Quinn,  Product Line Manager for Data Acquisition,  Curtiss-Wright

Day 1 Afternoon Session – Flight testing and Simulation

Aerodynamic and noise at high speeds: what typology of military technologies can be transferred to civil aviation

David Bacci, Research Fellow, University of Oxford

15:30 - 16:00

Coffee Break

16:00 - 17:00 - Case Study

Day 1 Afternoon Session – Flight testing and Simulation

Testing Motors and Inverters for Electric Aircraft – Components to Full Aircraft Electrical Networks|

Mitch Marks, Business Development – Electrification, HBK

Day 1 Afternoon Session – Flight testing and Simulation

Avensis Aviation - Presentation Title TBC

Christian Sutter, CEO, Avensis Aviation

09:00 - 12:30 - Case Study

Day 2 Morning Session – Advance engines, materials, structures and aerodynamics

Day 2 Morning Session – Advance engines, materials, structures and aerodynamics

Plasma preheating technology for ablation studies of hypersonic and supersonic vehicles

Daniel Odion Iyinomen, Project Manager/Researcher, Wagners/University of Southern Queensland

Day 2 Morning Session – Advance engines, materials, structures and aerodynamics

Day 2 Morning Session – Advance engines, materials, structures and aerodynamics

High-temperature antenna materials for supersonic and hypersonic applications

Vasileios Karkasinas, Aerospace Engineer, Chelton

Day 2 Morning Session – Advance engines, materials, structures and aerodynamics

Friction stir welds with enhanced fatigue strength and life via post-weld laser peening

Joana Antunes, Doctoral Researcher, Cranfield University

Friction stir welding (FSW) has been studied as a viable solid state joining process for aircraft fuselage structures. As any other high temperature joining process, it introduces tensile residual stress fields and leads to microstructural changes in the structure which would adversely affect the performance of a joint. FSW may also introduce defects which would act as sites for fatigue initiation and propagation. Laser peening (LP) is being studied as an advanced and viable surface treatment option to introduce a compressive residual stress state in a fuselage structure which could potentially recover the fatigue life by preventing initiation and propagation of fatigue damage. The presentation will focus on fatigue crack – stress interaction in fuselage structures/joints subjected to fatigue loading and how designing of laser peening process is vital to achieve the necessary recovery of fatigue life.

Day 2 Morning Session – Advance engines, materials, structures and aerodynamics

Innovate through Biomimicry – Helicoid technology for the next generation of ultra-tough lightweight composite structures

Lorenzo Mencattelli, Director of R&D, Helicoid Industries

Fibre-reinforced plastics (FRPs) offer outstanding structural efficiency to deliver high strength, high stiffness, lightweight aerostructures. However, the inherent brittleness of high-performance reinforcements used in aerospace often leads to poor damage resistance. This results in over-designed structures and excess weight which reduces performance and fuel efficiency of current aircrafts. Biomimicry is an effective tool to address the poor damage resistance of FRPs. The key to the high damage resistance of bio-inspired solutions is their ability to control damage growth by activating highly dissipative failure mechanisms that allow to delay catastrophic failure and provide a superior structural integrity. Bioinspired Helicoid architectures found in plant, crustaceans, and bones offer a scalable, cost-effective solution with significant performance improvements compared to conventional FRPs. Helicoid technology has demonstrated the ability to improve several composite sectors where high impact resistance, structural integrity and durability are key. The presentation will describe how biomimicry, and specifically Helicoid technology can be used as an innovation catapult for the next generation of ultra-tough, impact tolerant composite structures. The nature-inspired origins, damage control mechanisms, manufacturing routes, performance enhancement and structural weight savings related to Helicoid technology will be presented for various composites applications. Specific focus will be given to aerostructures, including insights on high-speed applications.

13:30 - 15:30 - Case Study

Day 2 Afternoon Session – Sonic boom, noise control and legislation

Day 2 Afternoon Session – Sonic boom, noise control and legislation

Beam - Presentation Title TBC

Flavio Menichino, CEO, Beam

Day 2 Afternoon Session – Sonic boom, noise control and legislation

H2020 STRATOFLY: main challenges of high-speed civil transport aviation

Dr. Nicole Viola, Associate Professor of Aerospace Systems Design, Politecnico di Torino, Italy

Day 2 Afternoon Session – Sonic boom, noise control and legislation

16:00 - 17:00 - Panel Discussion

Sonic boom, noise control and legislation